Various - black vocal groups volume 7


In the first decades of the 19th century, gospel songs were transmitted through Sunday-school hymnbooks. Among the most widely used song collections during this period were those compiled by Lowell Mason , William B. Bradbury, Robert Lowry, and William Howard Doane. Fanny Crosby was the leading writer of gospel hymn texts. After the American Civil War (1861–65), the Sunday-school repertoire was appropriated and expanded to serve the Protestant revival movement, especially in urban areas. Singer and composer Phillip D. Bliss was among the most important figures in this endeavour, as were evangelist Dwight L. Moody and his musical collaborator Ira D. Sankey . Together, Moody and Sankey employed the Sunday-school hymns and new gospel compositions in their church services as major instruments of edification and conversion, thus playing a critical role in the establishment of gospel music as a legitimate means of ministry.

The term "Choir" has the secondary definition of a subset of an ensemble; thus one speaks of the "woodwind choir" of an orchestra, or different "choirs" of voices or instruments in a polychoral composition. In typical 18th- to 21st-century oratorios and masses , chorus or choir is usually understood to imply more than one singer per part, in contrast to the quartet of soloists also featured in these works.


Various - Black Vocal Groups Volume 7Various - Black Vocal Groups Volume 7Various - Black Vocal Groups Volume 7Various - Black Vocal Groups Volume 7

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